Category Archive: Uncategorized

NAPCAN board member Shanti Raman helps launch Violence Against Children of the World report

NAPCAN is excited to share the work of our esteemed board member Shanti Raman who has just helped launch the collaborative report: Violence against children of the world, discussing the issue of violence against children and recommendations for action.

The report, by the International Society for Social Pediatrics and Child Health, International Pediatric Association, International Society for Prevention of Child Abuse & Neglect, Know Violence in Childhood, Global Partnership to End Violence in Childhood, was launched at the inaugural 1st South Asia Regional Conference on Child Rights from Nov 15 – 17.

Download the full report.

Download a summary of the report.

    

PLAY YOUR PART Commitment Statement

Children’s Week is a great time to remind ourselves about the importance of putting the safety and wellbeing of children at the centre of our decision making.

NAPCAN’s new PLAY YOUR PART Commitment Statement is designed to be printed out, signed, and displayed to send a clear message about how we treat and interact with children.

The wording is suitable for anyone who interacts with children in any way – as a member of a family or community, as a volunteer, or in the workplace. Ideally it can also be included as part of an organisation’s induction materials in order to develop a whole-of-organisation commitment to put children’s wellbeing at their centre of their work.

Download by clicking here and sign the Commitment Statement today!

NAPCAN launches 30-second clip to support Talk to Your Baby campaign

Did you know that you can help a baby’s brain develop just by talking?

In fact, research suggests that the more words and concepts a baby is exposed to (even when they are just a newborn!), the better their brain will develop, and the better they will do in reading and cognitive tests as they grow up.

The key messages of the Talk to Your Baby campaign are:

  • A baby’s brain triples in size during the first three years of life. So every little thing we do during that time plays an important part in that child’s development.
  • Look for every opportunity to talk, read and sing with your baby. Be expressive, be loving, and talk about everything around you so that your child is exposed to as many different conversations as possible.
  • Talking to babies does not come naturally to everyone, and most people will need some encouragement and ideas. Families and carers may never have been told how important it is to talk with very young children, they may not have been raised that way, or they may have other things on their minds.
  • We can all play our part by talking to babies and young children, and by reminding parents how important this is, and giving them ideas and tips to get them into the habit.
  • Lots of talk from loving adults also builds healthy relationships, social skills, and attachment and we know that that can help build resilience in a child.

View the clip on YouTube.

Download the Media Release (PDF)