Category Archive: Press/Media

Article on Domestic Violence by Victorian Police Commissioner, Ken Lay: “This is a bloke’s issue”

Article by Ken Lay September 4, 2013:

I want you all to imagine something with me. Imagine that each week an Australian is murdered at a train station.

That each week, someone’s brother or sister; mother or father is violently killed getting on or off a train. Picture it?

Now picture the public response.

It would be a front-page news story in each of our capital cities. Police would flood our stations, while people would avoid public transport in favour of private cars. Congestion would quickly become a major problem, as the number of cars on the roads increased. The word “crisis” would pepper our talkback.

Can you imagine it?

Okay.

Now I have another figure — a real figure — that I think is just as horrific. A figure that is just as worthy of galvanising our sympathy and outrage. But it doesn’t.

The figure is this: every week a woman is murdered by her partner or ex-partner.

Every week this happens.

Now, our public response isn’t at all like we imagined it would be if those victims died not in their family rooms but at train stations.

read the rest of the article at The Hoopla  

Early action is key to improving the lives of all children.

Great article in the Sydney Morning Herald by Anne Hollonds who is the chief executive of the Benevolent Society.

Last week I found myself reading the harrowing account of a day in the life of a Family and Community Services caseworker in the Herald. I only made it to ”10am” before I had to stop. The memories of my time as a front-line child protection worker came flooding back.

I did that job for four years in the 1980s – and then moved on to work as a child and family counsellor in community health and in non-government organisations, and eventually in the management of these services.

Those early years spent in frontline child protection have left their mark, and I am passionate about promoting the well-being of children and families, especially those most vulnerable because of disadvantage.

Everyone agrees that more needs to be done to protect children at risk of serious harm, but so far in the recent debate in NSW no one has asked: Why are there 60,000 children in our community whose lives are so dangerous at home that they need child protection services to monitor them?

Child Protection Week next week offers us the opportunity to face up to an uncomfortable reality: that we have created a system that relies on sending more and more ambulances to the bottom of the cliff, instead of building a fence at the top of the cliff to keep kids safe. The truth is that there will never be ”enough” child protection workers if we expect them to do all the heavy lifting and we wait until the damage is done before anyone acts.

Read full article in Sydney Morning Herald

Families Australia, National Child Protection Week press release, 30 August 2013

National Child Protection Week highlights ongoing national tragedy 

On the eve of National Child Protection Week (1-7 September), Families Australia has called for vastly more effort to make protecting children everyone’s business. 

Applauding NAPCAN’s outstanding leadership in running National Child Protection Week for over 20 years, Families Australia’s CEO and Convenor of the Coalition of Organisations Committed to the Safety and Wellbeing of Australia’s Children, Brian Babington, said ‘child abuse and neglect continues to be one of the nation’s most serious problems.’

Nationally, over the 12 months to June 2012, the number of children who were the subject of abuse or neglect substantiations increased from 31,527 to 37,781.

‘The over-representation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people in the child protection system remains particularly serious. In 2011–12, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children were almost eight times as likely to be the subject of substantiated child abuse and neglect as non-Indigenous children.’

The National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children is a major advance. Yet, greater effort by all parties—governments, the NGO sector and the community at large—is needed to achieve a substantial reduction in rates of abuse and neglect.

More is needed to tackle the underlying causes of child abuse and neglect, particularly in responding early to the needs of families and children who are experiencing vulnerability.

Download PDF: Families Australia National Child Protection Week 30 August 2013